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Mortuary Science

mcc_mortuary_science_june2015

Working in a funeral home requires tact, discretion, and compassion in dealing with grieving people. Persons interested in the field should have the desire and ability to comfort people in their time of sorrow. Funeral directors arrange the details and handle the logistics of funerals. They communicate with family members, members of the clergy, social workers, psychologists, physicians and surgeons and other healthcare professionals.

How to Become a Funeral Service Worker

An associate’s degree in mortuary science is the minimum education requirement for morticians, undertakers, funeral directors, and funeral service managers. After leaving MCC, you will need to receive further schooling in the mortuary field in order to become licensed. With the exception of funeral service managers, all workers must be licensed.

The median annual wage for funeral service workers was $51,600 in May 2012.

Job Outlook

Employment of funeral service workers is projected to grow 12 percent from 2012 to 2022, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Those who are licensed as both funeral directors and embalmers and are willing to relocate should have the best job opportunities.

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MCC Admissions Office

Contact the MCC Admissions Office for all of your questions … we’re here to help! To get to our office, park in the northwest pa...

Contact the MCC Admissions Office for all of your questions … we’re here to help! To get to our office, park in the northwest parking lot on the MCC campus and take the short sidewalk to the main MCC entrance, labeled Door #1. We’re just inside and to the left!

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